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Episode 27

In our interview with Elizabeth Reed, we discuss the media’s influence — for better or for worse — on LGBTQ identity, culture, and interpretations.

We learn how “identities are constituted within, not outside of representation,” we discuss how to combat media invisibility, the ways that the LGBTQ community faces discrimination, and how the media is central in articulating everyone’s identity.

Elizabeth Reed is a cultural sociologist and lecturer at Goldsmiths University in London whose research focuses on LGBTQ relationships and families, contemporary childhood, and the role of media and cultural representations in identity-making.

If you’ve enjoyed listening, please take one minute to write a review for our podcast. We would also sincerely appreciate it if you would give us your feedback using the link on our website or by emailing hello@bbxx.world. Any questions, concerns, ideas, or suggestions are always more than welcome!

Sasza Lohrey

I’d love to kind of talk to invisibility versus representation. I’m going to read a quote here from you and then continue with the questions. So this was mentioned in your thesis coming out. Queer is not merely a personal process of identity but involves a cultural process of reassessing, embracing, refusing, and combining media representations. And again, I think this is something that is so true for for us all. Regardless of any associations or different identities, we’re all so confused. So constantly reassessing our identities and also so restricted by but dependent on the media, and especially when the media in some ways and especially today, as its transformed and progressed lends to these new representations but in a way I find also lens to new restrictions. I can almost be misleading being like, Look, we’re we’re representative, but they almost say More subtly play into certain stereotypes and so I’d very huge question but love to kind of hear from the perspective of the past to begin kind of where we stood with representation and how kind of restricted or how that played into people’s identity development in the past, and then we can continue to the present day.

Elizabeth Reed

Absolutely. So I think most of what I’m talking about here is going to be very much Western very much Anglophone representation, because that’s where my research looks. I’m also broadly talking from a British perspective, I think those things are important to note because representation and culture, they vary wildly, and they mean so many different things. I think first, it’s really important to say that queer people have always existed in representation, we often think of finally a gay character on TV. Actually what that usually means is we’re describing finally a character who has been explicitly labeled as gay and has said repeatedly I am getting those codes by which we might see ourselves and see queerness have been present. For a very long time. There’s a lot of work written about the art, of queer reading of seeing queer things, or finding queer characters, or finding points of identification in mainstream media in particular, by queer people throughout history. And that means looking for kind of codes ways of being I think one of my favorite examples, perhaps is Calamity Jane the film Calamity Jane so often thought of as a lesbian film. And there’s a number and hugely loved by lots of queer people for a lot of the content of that film. So the resolution of Calamity Jane, of course, is to heterosexual weddings. However, that’s sort of a side note. And what is for many people a very quick story, which is Calamity Jane continually mistaken for a woman goes and kidnapped a woman to bring her back to their city to to play in a theater. She and the woman both rejected all the men in the town and moved together and sang a lovely song called A Woman’s Touch. About the uniqueness of a woman’s touch around the home and have a generally lovely little house together. very intimate, really, they set up home they have an intimate relationship. They have a friendship, but it’s a very deep friendship. So the crisis point in the movie comes when calamity and Katie Brown is the friend. I’ve been living together for some time and Calamity’s incredibly happy and Katie Brown receives a proposal of marriage from one of the hunky guys in the show is and, and it kind of follows in a neat kind of way. The film quickly tries to resolve this and gives Calamity a wedding proposal as well. And she sings an incredibly mournful song called Secret Love, in which she reflects on how she had a secret love. And it’s now kind of come to the fore and been recognized but it doesn’t quite come off as a sort of finally, my love has been resolved and I get to marry my love. It very much comes off as very sad. I’ve been hiding the secret love for so many years and it’s hurt me it’s had this pain. And it’s here but it’s gone. So there’s this undercurrent or subtext within the entire film, which is read frequently as as a queer film. And this is the sort of reading has happened and does happen for queer people to find space in representations, which exist in the mainstream, which are very available to very easy to access, in which non heterosexual relationships and non heterosexual intimacies can be seen and celebrated. So those songs, those kind of characters become kind of totems of what it means to be gay, what it means to be queer, what it means to have a relationship, which is secret of a love, which you can’t talk about. And those kind of ways of seeing ways of reading are have historically been used by gay people have historically been used by by LGBT people to insert those stories into the mainstream in plain sight, and kind of disguise them subtly, usually just by kind of tacking on a heterosexual resolution, which is quite nice. And that’s used still in my research, I found lots and lots of parents use these kinds of tactics. To find ways to talk about their families, to reassure their children, that their family fitted, that there was space in society for their family, that their family was acknowledged and validated in some way. And one example is of a family who said they were one of the poly poly couples, it’s not really great. This is where our language sometimes falls down. I think they were poly, they were both bisexual, and together, they had a child. And they also had other partners living with them at different times. And although their other partners didn’t parent their child, they kind of supported them parenting. And they talked to me about a show from the 60s called the clangers. It’s a British show. It’s a stop motion animation, which has been remade again now by the BBC. And in the episode they talked about the climbers who are trying to. It’ll be a kind of mouse like race who live on a moon and their friend the soup dragon who is a dragon who makes soup.

Sasza Lohrey 

What else? I already love him or her.

Elizabeth Reed 

Or her, well so the soup dragon is really unhappy because she doesn’t have a baby. And the clangers kind of they consult about what to do about this and they they consult with their friend the iron chicken who’s really wise as as iron chickens they want to be and the iron chickens as well as the dragons sad because she wants to have a baby you can help that you can make that happen. We don’t need a daddy soup dragon. We just need the soup dragon and you guys you guys being a community all you need to do is gather up these things and they’re quite abstract they have to get some musical notes.

Sasza Lohrey 

And this is how the ingredients to make a baby.

Elizabeth Reed 

To make a baby yeah, yeah an egg. Put this all together in an egg and iron chicken fires a laser at the egg, laser yet to fertilize. And then a baby soup dragon hatches.

Sasza Lohrey 

And oh, it’s not a Super Dragon iron chicken.

Elizabeth Reed

No, no, chicken. No, no, that’s your chicken. 

Sasza Lohrey 

Or a super an iron dragon

Elizabeth Reed 

It’s just a soup dragon. And the soup dragon is absolutely delighted. And she celebrates and all the climbers celebrate anything, and they kind of live happily ever after.

Sasza Lohrey 

So community is the family.

Elizabeth Reed 

Yeah. So this is a show they loved watching with their child. And it seemed to mirror the kind of relationships they had and the support they had from friends and family and the support they gave to other other people as well. And other friends who, for example, sought to become loan parents and sought to build their families in different ways. And it’s this kind of finding stories in plain sight. So this idea that representation of LGBTQ people is always lacking is true in kind of a broad way. And I’m not dismissing The importance of having explicitly queer characters on TV having explicitly trans characters on TV, and film and radio and everything else. 

Sasza Lohrey 

Media yeah, all the media.

Elizabeth Reed 

All the media, but I think it’s, I think it’s really important to note that people find solutions, people find ways of finding themselves and talking about themselves in different ways. And, and those ways have existed for a really long time are in some ways, part of the kind of cultural knowledge that I was talking about before, which comes from being part of a community. You can go to a gay club I used to go two years ago used to go to a tiny gay pub, the only gay pub in Lancaster, which is up north in a very small city. And we all turned up there as wide eyed 18 year olds to learn about our community, and were inducted into it by drag queens and older and older gay people who taught us the story He taught us the different musicals who taught us the different cultural notes that had been passed along and shared and had different meanings. And that keeps happening. We keep passing on, we keep sharing. And I think it’s an interesting way of thinking about family as well. That family expands far beyond those narrower kind of things we thought about before to what knowledge can we share about who we are and where we can find out each other. It’s passed on through songs, it’s passed on through films, as passed on to TV is passed on to the client as apparently in lots of different ways.

Sasza Lohrey 

And it was passed on originally through storytelling. Kind of the first version of media but I, I love that idea especially since we all have very complex identities, whether kind of ethnicity or racially or kind of interests that we have in niche interests are coming from different structures of families. It’s so hard in general to find a representation of somebody in the media that you really identify with. So I think the importance of really kind of going to maybe more non traditional media really just kind of digging deeper and seeking it out is a really important lesson.

Elizabeth Reed 

I think so and I think as well is that it’s difficult, it is difficult never to see yourself represented and having to work at it having to work at finding ways to talk about yourself having to work at having cultural reference points, saying you see that character, we kind of like them. That’s really helpful that helps all of us orientate ourselves in society and culture. And if you don’t have that you do work at it. But by being forced to work at it, you’re sometimes also going to think a lot harder about what works for you. Is that kind of typical relationship the best relationship for me, is the expectation that I will meet someone famous nokomis moving with them, have kids, that kind of very normative lifestyle, which we all kind of think critically about to a degree. If you never see anyone like you represented doing that, then you have to maybe start thinking, Well, actually, is any of that what I need? Is any of that what I want? Is this gonna help me towards a fulfilling way of life? A fulfilling relationship? Would it be better if I had multiple partners? Would it be better? If right now I was with a woman in the future, maybe I would be with a non binary person? Is my identity as fixed is that just because when I was a kid, I was a girl? Is that who I’m going to be in the future? And I think there are kind of, I’m always reluctant to say it’s a terrible time being gay because it’s not there are lots of wonderful different ways of being different knowledges different sharing different culture that we that we have that we share the We can reflect on. And whilst I wouldn’t for a minute undermine how difficult it can be and how challenging and the types of discrimination, LGBTQ people continue to face. There is a rich culture, which comes with it and there is a rich reflection on how we might want to live and how we might move forward, which I think all of us can gain from and can keep reflecting on.

Sasza Lohrey

So to kind of bring context to visibility and representation in media, I think it’s important to take context from history in certain, be it legislation or the media that has existed in the past. But I would love you to kind of help our listeners maybe understand how some of these events from the past have kind of shaped the world and the media that we live in today.

Elizabeth Reed 

Yeah, I think it’s interesting to note that the idea that we shouldn’t be talking about LGBT relationships hasn’t always existed. There was a real movement around the kind of beginning of the 20th century, reflecting on all the different ways in which human sexuality happens, an emphasis on what was at the time called inverts, which is an old fashioned word for homosexuality. And there was an increasing kind of interest in what that might mean and what it might mean to live as an invert. And there were books like Radcliffe halls, the wall of loneliness, which was all about lesbian relationships, and I’m very passionately written, exploring discrimination, exploring anxiety about being a lesbian or as it was called, at the time in the woman and trying to find women to be where to have relationships with and what that meant. And it was incredibly well received that book initially. And then as so often happens, there was a bit of a running up to outrage. And there was ultimately an obscenity trial over the book. And it was bound on the grounds that it promoted lesbian relationships as being okay. It kind of presented this as well you know, there’s love here, there’s something positive here, even whilst it represented hardship and happiness. And that kind of had a knock on for what kind of books what kind of art people felt they could put forward and not face and obscenity trial, there was a real anxiety that anything which represented lesbian relationships, for example, as positive as fulfilling as enjoyable, was going to fall foul of obscenity laws and that kind of pattern of backwards and forwards on you Let’s try and think about what it means to have relationships that aren’t heterosexual, let’s talk about people’s experiences these things being pushed back against, well, you’re undermining heterosexuality you are making it to rescue you are giving people the impression that this is a good thing to choose is a very common pattern of history. We’re seeing it right now. In fact, the idea that just talking about being trans will somehow transform children into trans adults is sort of that same pattern again, the idea that just being exposed to the idea, hearing that it’s okay, not to be cisgender not to be heterosexual, we’ll just ping produce gay and trans children. And in the UK, that really came to a head in the 80s. There was a book called Jenny Lives with Eric and Martin, it was distributed to schools with a view to being used by teachers, not not children, to help them understand that not all of their pupils. likely to come from heterosexual families. And it depicted the life of a girl Jenny with her fathers Eric and Martin. At the time, the papers the tabloids got hold of this outraged and, and a kind of moral panic exploded across the country suggesting that gays were trying to corrupt our youth. They were trying to go try to turn all the children they were trying to destroy the family and society was going to come crashing down. And the response from the Conservative government at the time was to introduce a piece of legislation which has come to be known as section 28. And was in fact for the nerds out there. Clause 28 of the Local Government Act 1988. In it explicitly banned the teaching or promotion of homosexuality as a pretend family relationship. So, in effect, it meant that teachers were not allowed to speak about to acknowledge to recognize that not every family was heterosexual. And not every relationship was heterosexual for fear of prosecution, that law was in place until 2003. Yeah, which is I think people are always surprised by and it’s sort of an example of our perfectly it worked is that people didn’t know what was missing from schools because nobody was allowed to talk about it and the fear of individuals because it was, if you were found to have flouted this law, this clause, it would be an individual prosecution. So the teacher who spoke about non heterosexual relationships would have been individually prosecuted for this rather than the school as a whole.

Sasza Lohrey 

And with that include openly identifying with their own identity.

Elizabeth Reed 

Yeah, absolutely. So the fear that to be known to be gay would itself been tough because it’s because it’s quite vague wording, what does it mean to promote Does it mean just to speak about it? Or does it mean to say it’s better than being heterosexual? But that vagueness really worked to instill a lot of fear and a lot of worry about how can you cope with this, how can you deal with this? And so whilst up to sort of 88, we might suggest there was some kind of forward movement to inclusion and diversity in the types of families being represented 88 in the UK marker, kind of full stop in that a very significant stop point. And whilst mainstream media increasingly represented LGBTQ lives and started to think about and talk about non heterosexual parents, schools, very particularly, and very specifically continued to pretend that didn’t exist, there just was no scope to talk about it in schools. So there was a real arresting of what type of media was available in schools and could be spoken about in schools and I think it’s interesting that it was promoted, it was prompted by this book, this idea that a single representation could be that disrupted to everything, every single part of the world of society was going to come falling down around this one book. And it was somehow representative of a change in society, which some of the tabloids and the Conservative government decided was like no, this is not the change we’re going to have. 

Sasza Lohrey 

So interesting. The idea of what promotion mean and if it’s something people are afraid of, even being neutral is interpreted as promoting versus if it’s something that people are welcoming and excited about and identify with and neutral wouldn’t even qualify as promoting. So you mentioned in your research and kind of in that piece, just there,  how much people look to the media to find their own kind of role and an identity as a parent. And I think that is true for across kind of all peoples gender and sexuality. identifications, I often say that parenting is the best example, and evidence and proof that fake it till you make it real and then nobody knows what they’re doing. And there really aren’t guidelines out there. And so media does become, you know, besides whatever parenting experience you had or didn’t have growing up, mixed with media, and kind of any of your findings in your past research. And then if you have anything to speak to from your, your current and ongoing research as well.

Elizabeth Reed

Yeah. So I think that kind of balancing of coming driving forward from the idea of this banning this banning of any discussion of different kinds of families in schools and A lot of the parents in my research like me grew up during this period I went to the entire period I was at school was perfectly covered by this piece of legislation. So there’s a thought of, well, what do I want to do for children? If I have children now? How am I going to change the education they had versus the education I had? A lot of the parents I spoke to talked about a feeling of responsibility of ensuring their children had models and value place on any identity they might find in the future. And an anxiety to ensure that their children didn’t feel they had to fight through stigma didn’t have to feel they had to fight to find representations that helped them understand who they were and talk about who they were. So a lot of parents were trying to find representations, things to point out to their children, not just to say this is who we are as a family, but also to kind of furnish their children with the resources. They might need for any number of different kinds of life courses. And that includes being heterosexual as well as being as well as being LGBT. And for some of those parents, particularly a lot of the women I spoke to, there was a feeling that as lesbian women, they’ve been brought up to hearing that lesbians weren’t mothers, lesbians were not really women. That kind of negative stereotypes of lesbians being not feminine. And not mothers for sure or not around children, led them to feel that when they became mothers, when they chose that when they rejected the expectation, they couldn’t be there. They had to work out a way to be mothers, which was also a way to be lesbian mothers. A way to keep their identity their individual identity and the value they placed on that connection to lesbian and bisexual people. Unity, present in their identities and take for the things they’ve learned and kind of navigated particularly around gender, so many of them. One person I spoke to talked about feeling as a lesbian growing up as a lesbian, you have to reflect on what it means to be a woman. Because there’s so many expectations about what it means to be a woman which are tied up with a very particular kind of femininity, and that femininity being tied up with heterosexuality. So if you’re a lesbian, how do you negotiate what it means to be a woman? Can you be feminine and be a lesbian? Of course you can. But trying to find a way to articulate that and make it make sense here can be really challenging. Similarly, some of the women I spoke to talked about how few representations there were of Butch women parenting, that whilst it is getting to the point now, where in lots of mainstream representations you can see lesbian mothers, all of these lesbian mothers, or at the very least, often, just two women together, so they might be bisexual mothers. We don’t know are incredibly feminine and conform to motherhood, as it exists in lots of traditional ways. They look like a good feminine woman who just happens to be with another woman instead of a man. And they were talking about how this values a very normative idea of motherhood and femininity to be a mother, you must be feminine and they were saying, I’m not feminine. Why can’t I have a representation of who I am? I have a lot to offer my kids too. I’m a good mother too. There isn’t. There needs to be space to recognize the diversity of gender expression that comes and is tied up with motherhood. Some of the women I spoke to said, Mother isn’t even an identity. I want a parent. I birth a child but mother isn’t who I am. I have a whole other identity. Mother is tied up with too much stuff. It’s tied up with too much to do with femininity. It’s tied up to do with too much to do with heterosexuality and nuclear family and I want to different way forward, I want to present to my children, a different way of parenting that says, I am this person, genetically your mother, but also, my role to you my relationship to you is about way more than a very narrow idea of what Mother might be. And they wanted to present their children different ways of parenting. They wanted to say, Well, if I tell my child I’m not a mother, they should call me by my name, for example. Then can I help my child work out different ways of doing family as they grow up? Can I help my child think differently about how we come together, the choices we’re making? Kind of responsibilities to one another, I guess I need to say about sex. Just that I kind of mentioned it a little bit the idea that often if you’re not heterosexual, you’re presumed to be too sexual. So a lot of the parents I spoke to talked about a lot of the pushback against LGBT people parenting being, won’t someone think of the children they Can’t be exposed to this horrible, weird sex that non heterosexual people have. And that’s being played out currently in protests that are happening around the country at the moment against inclusive sex and relationship education in schools, which people are campaigning against the inclusion of information about non heterosexual sex in it as though somehow that’s inappropriate for children to understand, but heterosexual sex isn’t.

Sasza Lohrey 

And that’s a global campaign?

Elizabeth Reed 

I think it’s echoed around the world but currently it’s kind of reaching fever pitch in the UK in particular, it’s been focused around Birmingham, but it’s spread out to a few other cities as well. I heard yesterday that Nottingham had also received protesters. So it’s there’s a there’s a big push back against the idea that anything to do with non heterosexual sex should never be spoken about in front of children, as though and one of my participants said this as though our bedrooms don’t have doors. I love I love the idea that that’s the the anxiety is that somehow our bedrooms don’t have towards heterosexual parents bedrooms have. heterosexual people just do really ordinary things in their bedrooms. And somehow being queer means you have incredibly weird sex, which might be true, but you can definitely have incredibly weird sex. If you’re heterosexual.

Sasza Lohrey 

I’d also just love to clarify how incredibly weird children think their parents, regardless of their parents are and they are generally and this is probably unhealthy in general, how much they’re really like, disgusted by the thought of their parents regardless of who they are having sex, so I don’t think any form of it would like be appealing nor promoting it to them. Well, I just had kind of one last question to close up having to do any kind of current events, I’m not sure if you followed the Women’s Soccer World. Yeah, I’ve seen it freeze up about it. And yeah, the the articles that came out and the fact that the two teams that were in the finals had the most openly queer or gay members on their team, and how this kind of created this amazing wave of awareness and promotion and kind of how around the world, there have been so many people who have come out saying how much they identified with their needs, felt supported and kind of motivated. And this was such an amazing example of representation in the media in such a positive and like strong light. So I just was curious if you had any thoughts about that?

Elizabeth Reed 

Yeah, I think the takeaway I would like people to have is that my thoughts on representation is that representation isn’t good and it isn’t bad. It’s just a tool. And for some people that will be the, the shattering moment of Finally I exist, someone can see me. And many, many, many LGBT people have had that at some point in their lives. I think the value of being able to talk about your identity, through reference to other people through reference to fictional people or real people that you can see in media that everyone else can see, which is really easily accessible cannot be understated. And certainly in my research again and again, people have talked about how being seen and how people explicitly acknowledging they see your identity is incredibly useful. In research on bisexual people’s relationships, many bisexual people who are in relationships with heterosexual people talked about how it changed how they felt about themselves every time their partner explicitly acknowledged that they were still bisexual, corrected people who assumed they were now heterosexual. And how it allowed them to have a sense of their identity, not just being recognized, but by being recognized that it was valid. Seeing, for example, the US women’s football team being celebrated for their incredible success and having them explicitly say and be seen as lesbians changes how you might feel about yourself because you can see success and you can see acknowledged, and you can see society as a whole saying, This is good. This is a person who we respect.

Sasza Lohrey 

we want to be and that’s regardless of kind of the people’s identities. I remember I read an article written by a mom who had asked her young son, do Boys wear the soccer jerseys of the women’s team at school. And his answer was just, yeah. Why? Yeah. Like, yeah. And then her silently celebrating. This thing that for her was groundbreaking, but for her son was just kind of de Yeah. And asking her older daughter who was in high school and kind of getting the same response, that kind of neutral. Yeah, just an acknowledgement in a way that I don’t know was just so profound. But again, that sometimes acting as if it was nothing, in some instances isn’t good, but in some instances makes it transformative. 

Elizabeth Reed 

I think Richard Dyer says that representation has real consequences for real people. We think of it as a femoral. We think of it as sometimes just on the edges of what we’re doing. But it’s not central, it’s Central and how we can talk about ourselves. It’s central to how we might feel about ourselves and others and helps as I understand ourselves and our relationships to others as well, because it gives us models, it gives us ways of talking about it.

Sasza Lohrey 

Amazing example of that. So thank you so much for joining us. And I look forward to sharing more of the resources with our listeners. And I’d love to put together a list of media resources for LGBTQ and for anybody seeking better representation or seeking media that lends itself to better representation. So thanks so much for joining me. 

Elizabeth Reed 

Thank you.

In this week’s two-part episode we talk with Dr. Elizabeth Reed, a cultural sociologist and lecturer at Goldsmiths, University of London, whose research focuses on LGBTQ relationships and families, contemporary childhood, and the role of media and cultural representations in identity-making. In the second episode, we continue the conversation by discussing the media’s influence on LGBTQ identity, the history of anti-gay legislation, and the gendered notion of motherhood. 

Queer Characters Have Always (Secretly) Existed 

Dr. Reed notes that LGBTQ characters have always existed in film, although they’ve been subtly disguised. She references the classic Old Hollywood film, Calamity Jane, as an example of media where the subtext reads as distinctly queer, even though the mainstream interpretation might miss these undertones. While popular storylines or characters may not be explicitly queer, she claims the queer community has always been able to find themselves or their stories in culture, albeit inconspicuously. These “cultural reference points” — whether they are easy to pinpoint or more difficult to find — are essential for orienting oneself within society.

The value of being able to talk about your identity through references to other people — through reference to fictional people or real people that you can see in media —cannot be understated.

Non-binary Love Stories Treated as Obscene

In 1928, Radclyffe Hall’s novel The Well of Loneliness, which follows the life of a wealthy lesbian Englishwoman, was charged with obscenity on the grounds that it promoted lesbian relationships.

Non-binary Love Stories Treated as Obscene (Cont’d)

Depicting homosexual love was seen as an  “undermining” of heterosexuality and was viewed as a threat to morality. Dr. Reed points out the similarities between this mentality and the current conservative mentality that trans visibility will “corrupt” and confuse young children.

Section 28 – Homophobic Legislation

In the late 1980s, the UK banned local authorities and schools from “teaching and promoting” homosexuality under Section 28. The clause wasn’t repealed until 2000 in Scotland and 2003 in Wales and England, and its painful legacy can still be felt today.

Motherhood ≠ Feminine 

In her interview-based research, Dr. Reed mentions that many queer women she spoke to lamented the lack of diversity surrounding the concept of motherhood. Motherhood has become synonymous with femininity, leaving many butch-identified lesbians alienated.

There needs to be space to recognize the diversity of gender expression that comes and is tied up with motherhood.

LGBTQ Media & Resources

No additional resources found for this episode.

About the Expert

Elizabeth Reed

Lizzie is a cultural sociologist whose research and writing focuses on LGBTQ relationships and families, contemporary childhood, and the role of media and cultural representations in identity-making. She is interested in exploring participatory research methods and connecting everyday lived experiences of families to wider social and political trends.

Episode Discussion

Home Forums Episodes 26 & 27: “You Can’t Be What You Can’t See” with Elizabeth Reed

  • Episodes 26 & 27: “You Can’t Be What You Can’t See” with Elizabeth Reed

  • Valentina 

    October 12, 2020 at 12:23 pm
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    • What did you learn about yourself?
    • What did you learn about culture?
    • What was your favorite quote?
    • What surprised you most?
    • What is one way you can enact what you learned in your own life?
    • How can we each help shift the culture and the conversation surrounding this topic?
  • Hope

    October 19, 2020 at 9:28 am
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    My favorite concept from this episode was “the idea of repeatedly coming out.” As someone who identifies as being heterosexual, this is just widely assumed that everyone is until proven otherwise (which is messed up). This podcast opened my eyes to think more about how unfair it is to the people who are apart of the LBGTQ+ community–due to having to go through this process of coming out constantly. It isn’t like they can just have a huge parade with everyone they’ve ever met in their life to deliver the news in one swoop, it is an ongoing update they have to say again and again whenever they’re comfortable to tell the other people in their life. Also, thinking about that the members of this community may have to come out repeatedly because they’re not being believed about their sexuality is absolutely absurd to me. It also makes me recognize what additional stress these lovely people may be experiencing ontop of finally feeling comfortable to come out. .

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